STORIES (text and pictures)
The stories are available at Philippe Henry’s office.


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Gaspésie park
In Quebec, the Gaspesie park covers 802 km2 and is well known by outdoor enthusiasts. Located in the heart of the Chic-Chocs and the McGerrigle mountains, the Gaspesie park is also a place for research. In this park, through deep valleys and high peaks, we discover fauna and flora typical of the boreal forest and of the arctic alpine environment.
In 2012, the park was celebrating its 75th anniversary.


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Bears at landfills
Dumps can attract bears from miles away, introducing them to a feast of non-natural food that often means ill-health or even death for the bears that eat it. Feeding on human garbage can cause numerous health concerns for bears - extensive tooth decay, lacerations on the paws and mouth, internal damage to organs from sharp objects, plastics blocking the intestines, ingestion of toxic substances and parasitic infections can all cause illness and death.
I shot these photographs when on assignment in Labrador.


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The spectacled bear
"Working with wild Andean or -spectacled- bears began in September 2001, when we captured the first bear, in the Alto Choco Reserve" said Armando Castellanos, director of the Andean Bear Conservation Project in Ecuador. "The project, unique in South America, has allowed us to capture and track thirteen wild radio-collared bears and two equipped with GPS collars. The study is currently providing data on the behaviour and environmental needs of the species."
In this story, that I have covered from 2008 to 2011, you will discover how a group of people try to save the last spectacled bears of Ecuador. You will see some of the very few photos of spectacled bears ever photographed in the wild.


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Carriers of Otavalo
In Otavalo, the indigenous market of the Plaza de los Ponchos is the biggest indigenous artisan market in all South America. It is held in a spot that has been a centre for trade and commerce for hundreds of years. It runs seven days a week. Each booth is set up every morning at dawn, after their owners brought goods down by any means possible. In September 2010, I have photographed the artisans in their preparation. Here are photos of some of them, who undoubtedly have very strong shoulders.


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Venezuela
In March 2010 I spent a few weeks in Venezuela where, circumstances are far from ideal for those whishing to buy a new car. In this country, with the cheapest gas on the planet, waiting lists for some new cars run up to two years due to legislation that set quotas on car imports. Cars appreciate in value as they age. Due to the shortage of new vehicles, used cars are in high demand and because there's so much demand for a limited number of used vehicles, the prices go up. Owners and dealers can make large profits. It is no wonder Venezuelans love their old cars. Here are some pictures I shot during my trip in the state of Lara.


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Bararida, green zone in the city
In Venezuela, a few miles from the center of Barquisimeto, the Bararida zoo and botanical garden is a heaven for various species of fauna and flora.
More than 11 ecosystems are represented. Under Rosangela Pereira’s direction, the park’s team develops programs of education, preservation and conservation.


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Moose country
Thanks to its climate and diverse habitats, the Gaspesie National Park houses a great variety of wildlife. Throughout the year the park attracts many Canadian and foreign tourists who come here for hiking and for watching and photographing the moose. The pictures of this report were taken during fall 2009 in an area very popular with French tourists.


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The red fox
In January and February 2010, I have spent several weeks to photograph the red fox. I visited the region of Charlevoix and Manicouagan on the north shore of the St. Lawrence river, La Mauricie and the Gaspesie National Parks and other places in Quebec to photograph this animal which belongs to the same family as the coyote and the wolf and which is one of the most widespread mammals in Canada. I invite you to discover the most intimate portraits of this elusive animal.


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The last caribou of Gaspesie
There is nothing like hiking at the top of Mont Jacques Cartier, in the Gaspesie national park. It is one of the best places where one can watch the last woodland-mountain caribou living south of the St Lawrence river. Predators and logging are the main threats for these animals. Learn how biologists work to save this emblematic species..


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Luis Aguirre Torres
Painter Luis Eduardo Torres Aguirre had exhibitions in Europe and South America. His work is part of private collections around the world. In his paintings, one can see the woman-Pacha Mama, the mother of all life, the jaguar or puma, a symbol of Americanism, wolves, monkeys nearing extinction, colourful birds and snakes that defend their territories. "I am an artist who believes in life," he said."I protest peacefully, with the magic of colors and shapes, against exploitation and destruction of the natural environment in my country and especially in the Amazon forest, the main lung of our planet and the land of indigenous cultures." Philippe Henry has photographed Luis Aguirre at home in Quito. They are presently working on a children’s book project about the Andean Bear.


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Rickshaws in Peru
In the city of Puno, near Lake Titicaca, the traffic of tricycles and rickshaws is ceaseless. Several hundred of these vehicles come and go in all directions, from morning to evening, loaded with goods or persons. It is a transport system which was initiated in early 1980 in several cities in southern Peru. It provides income to thousands of drivers.


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Dogs in Peru
In ancient Peru, it seems that dogs were treated like members of the family. While excavating human cemeteries of the Chiribaya culture, an agricultural society that thrived before the rise of the Inca, peruvian archeologists have recently discovered dozens of dogs buried in separate plots with warm blankets and even treats for the afterlife.
During my last trip to Peru, I didn't meet many dog lovers, those who give their pets food from the table and a space in their bed. Today, in peruvian cities, dogs are often left to themselves and roam the city streets alone or in packs. Let's go to Puno where many starving dogs and cats are delighted by the waste left on sidewalks.


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Gold Collection - Hugo Cohen
Metalworking and goldsmithing are linked to the history of Peru since the times of its oldest settlements. In Lima, in the Central Reserve Bank of Peru, the Gold Collection, dating back to the seventh century and discovered in the early 20th century by archaeologist Hugo Cohen, stands out for the excellent quality and preservation of its pieces, and offers a unique insight into the Nasca, Lambayeque, and Mochica goldsmithing traditions. Highlights include funeral masks and ornaments used for ritual purposes.


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Santa Catalina Monastery
Built in Arequipa, Peru in 1579, the Santa Catalina Monastery is a city within a city with a large complex of rooms, plazas, and narrow streets. During three centuries, the second daughters of upper-class families were sent there to enter religious services. This convent was shrouded in mystery until it opened to the public in 1970. Today, it is one of the most fascinating colonial religious building in Peru. There are stunning colors and the complex evokes feelings of true devotion.


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Yukon Red Squirrels. A startling discovery !
Philippe spent a few weeks in Yukon, at the "Squirrel Camp", near Kluane National Park, where biologist Stan Boutin and colleagues made startling discoveries.Two decades of studying Yukon's red squirrels yields surprising insights into adaptation and climate change. It seems that red squirrels have the ability to adapt to a warming word not only through physical and behavioural adjustments but through genetic changes.


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Otavalo: The big sweep
In Otavalo, the 'Fiesta del Yamor' is tied to the Andean agricultural cycle and specifically to corn, a symbol of fertility. Every year, in September, Otavalenos thank Mother Earth and celebrate the cultural diversity of the city. A few days before the 'fiesta' begins, local people give the city a deep sweep. Philippe spent a while with the firemen who help washing the city.


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Agave Sisalana
Two American administrations NASA and the NAVY are strongly interested in the agave Sisal. The NASA is interested in the antioxidizing characteristics of a part of the plant: a fat extract. This one could reduce the heat of the surfaces of vessels when they go into the atmosphere. For the Navy, the sisal will avoid problems of corrosion on ships, submarines and aircraft carriers. This plant also yields a stiff fiber used in making ropes, bags, hamacs and hats (the famous Panama).
Let's follow the photographer in the Ecuador highlands where farmers extract the fibers of agave sisalana.


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Otavalo, city of Frenzy
You can come any day of the week in Otavalo and you'll always be astonished by the city frenzy.
From 6am, with the rising sun, to late evening, from the "Poncho Plaza" to the central market, Otavaleno Indian are selling everything they can to make a living: squealing pigs and clucking chickens, hand-crafted items, textiles of all kinds, bananas and other fruits, pyramids of vegies, grains and fish...
This is one of the most friendly corner of the Ecuadorian Andes you can hit to mingle with the crowd.


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Ivvavik National Park
Ivvavik National, originally called Northern Yukon National Park, was established in 1984 through the settlement of the Inuvialuit land claim, which in turn stemmed from the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Inquiry in the 1970s. A large part of the reason for the establishement of this park - whose inuvialuktun name means "a place for giving birth" - is to protect the calving ground for the Porcupine caribou herd. With the caribou come the predators. Grizzlies range over the entire park. The caribou, sheep, grizzlies and other wildlife in the park share a widely varied and majestic landscape.
This story will tell you about one of the most remote national park of northern Canada.


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Quito - Ecuador
The mayor of Quito said: “Quito is a thousand years old city which, since prehistory was a place of meeting between the people and the cultures like between the tradesmen and the explorers. Its equinoctial position - one of its names being “the city with the vertical sun” - attracted there, several thousands years ago, primitive populations which settled in the plains close to lagoons which later were going to be called Iñaquito and Cotocollao, now districts of the city.
Creativity has been defined as: -the arrangement of pre-existing forms, objects, and facts in a new order by conceptual and emotional activity of the mind-. For me, creativity is experimenting. It doesn't impose limitations such as everything in sharp focus or producing what ones perceives as perfect work of art. Taking these pictures was fun and inspired. Through the camera, I had a new visual experience.


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Montreal under the snow
On March 9 2008, a snow storm hit Montreal full force, bringing chaos on the roads with 100 km/h flurries.
Montreal got 35 cm in two days. 3,47m of snow fell over the city since the beginning of winter. A record level!
Follow the photographer for a tour in the white city.


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Bears in La mauricie
The black bear population at La Mauricie National Park of Canada has been studied for close to 16 years. This research project, one of the longest ever to be conducted on this species in Canada, has allowed biologists to identified the kind of impacts human activities both inside and outside the park had on bears. Biologists have also learned that the female bears’ reproductive success rate was high enough to assure the long-term survival of the existing bear population.


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Karhu: The Finnish brown bear
Due to increase and expansion during the last few decades, the Finnish bear population has spread over most of the country except Åland Islands in the west and the open, low mountain area in the Utsjoki district in the north.
Most of the Finnish bears live along the border with Russia, where I took these pictures. Records made by the frontier guard detachment in Finland, have demonstrated that Finland has been receiving a considerable number of immigrants from the high-density Karelian population.


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The grey squirrel: a threat for Europe?
The grey squirrel was introduced in England in the second half of the 20th century. This species is causing a progressive disappearance of the native red squirrel and he causes damage to forests and tree commercial plantations because of bark-stripping.
Grey squirrels were also introduced in Italy in the 1950's. The Bern Convention has produced specific recommendations underlining the neccesity to eradicate them in this country in order to stop their further expansion in France and Switzerland and save the red squirrels from extinction.


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Mute Swans
Few people would deny that the mute swans are among the most beautiful bird species. They are extremely peaceful except in the defense of their young. These wild swans are very territorial. Once they have established a territory, they defend it to prevent intruders to set up their own territory nearby. I have spent years to photograph these birds in Germany and in Alsace, in the forests along the Rhin river.
The pictures feature the life cycle of these wonderful birds..


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Mexico
Mexico City, the world's largest city, is probably one of the most difficult cities to drive in, filled with exciting things to see and do. It is an incredible place to visit.
I have spent a few weeks there to photograph the city's daily life. The pictures were shot around Alameda Park, near the Zócalo and Palace of Fine Arts. This park has been around since 1541, making it the city's oldest park. It has been an Aztec market and was also the site of burning, hangings and executions in the old days. With it's walking paths, this park is full of old style, traditional charm.


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Suckling pigs
In their St-Canut Farm, Carl Rousseau and his partners raise pigs that taste like suckling pigs but are bigger and juicer. The trick is keeping weaned pigs on an all-milk diet, says Rousseau. These successfull farmers supply tables in New York and Montreal. Let's visit the farm and then meet Martin Paquet, Chef at the Beaver Club, in Montreal, who uses this premium meat to make great recipes.
Distributed by the photographer.


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A day with the Beagle
Text in French and English.
These tough dogs, track a hare with their fellows during a simulated hunt competition. Let's spend a day with the dogs, the owners and the judges at the Beagle Club of St Pierre de Sorel, in Québec. Late evening, the champions will be rewarded and the hare will get a rest till the next competition.
Distributed by the photographer.



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Ice fishing in Quebec
Text in French and English.
What better way to spend a calm March day than on the frozen waters of the parc des Iles de Boucherville in Quebec. Let’s follow ice fishermen practicing their favourite winter activity. Learn how, by -20 C, they use the ice chisel, hand auger, hooks and bait to catch yellow perch, pike and walleye.
Distributed by the photographer.


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Sugar shack in Quebec
Text in French and English.
Come and visit a genuine sugar shack, located in a wonderful mapple forest in St Mathieu du Lac (Quebec). You'll discover how the sap is collected, boiled and transformed in syrup. It takes about 40 litres of sap to make one litre of pure syrup, but the delicious golden liquid is well worth the trouble.
Distributed by the photographer.

Bull frogs.. threat or treat?
Text by Freddilee Howell (Available in French and English)
Many methods used for controlling the growing populations of American bullfrogs in Europe do more harm to the native species than, in fact, is done to the intruders from America. In more than 70 years this dominant anuran species has become well established within western European ponds and streams. The bullfrogs pose an ecological threat to native fauna, sometimes eating other amphibians, fish and even ducklings.. Though Europeans don't yet know how best to resolve the spreading problem, Texans suggest a more palatable way of dealing with the pest.
Follow Bill Howell as he hunts bullfrogs with a .22 rifle and prepares the ultimate delicacy.
Distributed by the photographer.

The wood turtle
Text in French and English.
The wood turtle is the only canadian turtle that lives more on land than in the water.
The dramatic decline of this species across its range in eastern Canada is sounding alarm bells. Habitat fragmentation, destruction, illegal collection and disturbance caused by some recreational activities have caused the few remaining known populations to become isolated from one another.
Luckily, this turtle is found in La Mauricie national park of Canada where conservation biologists have been studying this vulnerable reptile since 1996. The research has underlined the fragility of the park’s wood turtle population, which lives well outside what is considered the northern boundary of the reptile’s home range. It has also uncovered a need to take action, not only to help the population itself and its habitat, but to raise public awareness as well.
Distributed by the photographer.

The Common loon
Text in French and English.
Since 1987, the Conservation Service of La Mauricie national park has been keeping a close eye on the common loon population. This bird is a good indicator of the quality of aquatic ecosystems. The most easily accessible lakes are visited by canoe in order to confirm the presence of loons and locate their nests. The data gathered allows the park authorities to monitor the population and its rate of reproduction, to assess the impact of visitors on the area and to take protective measures. Evaluations are also carried out on the effects of atmospheric pollutants on aquatic ecosystems.
Distributed by the photographer.

Moose on the loose
Text in English
Close encounter with the Newfoundland moose. This giant is part of the culture. He is also an ecological threat and a nightmare for drivers.
Distributed by Gamma et Arco Digital agencies.

I tracked the black bear in Abitibi
Text in French
In a remote forest of Abitibi (Quebec), a team of biologists tracks the black bears to collect some hair. The root bulb of the hair contains a tiny amount of DNA, and from this DNA researchers can obtain a genetic "fingerprint" for each bear. Every bear has a unique set of DNA, and researchers are coming up with many ways to use DNA to study bears and learn more about their ecology.
Distributed by Gamma agency

The sleeping bear: the story of the bear named Mattawe
Text in English and French
In La Mauricie National Park, in Quebec, the black bear hibernates between five and seven months each year. The preferred sites for winter dens include small caves, crevices, and geologic features, or beneath deadfalls or blowdowns. Let’s follow the bear’s specialists of the park when they search for the den of a bear named Mattawe. She is supposed to have cubs..
Distributed by Gamma et Arco Digital agencies.

Sharp teeth in the swamp
Text in English and French
"The alligator slowly closes his jaws and bends his body. He points its snout to the sky and bellows by vibrating the air in his throat. Ten of alligators respond. Very soon there is a huge chorus all over the lake creating a sensation of a trembling and shaking marsh.." Photographer Philippe Henry had close encounters with the most powerful predator of the swamps of southeast Texas.
Distributed by Gamma, Arco Digital and Oxford Scientific Films agencies.

The Grouse, an exceptional bird
Text in French
Certain events have the power to change one's life... One beautiful spring day, wildlife artist Gisele Benoit meets a ruffed grouse. Incredibly, this bird follows her closely, and grabs the end of her braid with its beak, warning her that she is invading its territory. Intrigued by the strange behavior of this unusual bird, Gisele decides to begin a comprehensive study of the Ruffed and Spruce Grouse species. This story offers the reader an extraordinary glimpse of the private life of the grouse. It also conveys Gisele's passion for these woodland birds, and reveals the astonishing relationship she develops with them.
Distributed by Gamma agency

Mother Nature meets Father Time
Text in English
Some 500 million years ago, the continents of Africa and North America collided, and a huge slab of oceanic crust and underlying mantle rock was forced to the surface. This orange-brown landscape is the Tablelands, one of the natural wonder of Gros Morne National Park. In this story, learn more about Gros Morne, the largest national park in Atlantic Canada, which contains the most outstanding scenery east of the Rockies. Gros Morne's great natural beauty and unique geological features prompted the United Nations to add the Park to its list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 1987.
Distributed by Gamma et Arco Digital agencies.

People of the West Coast
Text in English
The history of the inhabitant of Newfoundland west coast.
Distributed by Gamma and Arco Digital agencies.

Chimborazo: the sacred mountain of the Puruhae people
Text in English
Learn about the daily life and the development efforts of the indigenous communities of Pulingui San Pablo and Chorrera Mirador Alto. These two Puruhae communities, comprising of 543 people, inhabit at 4000 meters, and have legal possession of 4200 hectares of land on Mt.Chimborazo, a 6300 meter inactive volcano whose plant and wildlife are protected because of its uniqueness.
Distributed by the photographer.

Wapiti story
Text in French
The Elk are in town! Drive carefully!
This is the only advice you will hear from the Estes Park's inhabitants. Every winter hundreds of elk travel down the mountain sides to downtown Estes Park, Colorado. Small herds can be seen roaming the private backyards, the golf course, and even the grassy area in front of the Mountain Sage Inn. They are not alone. With the elk comes the bighorn sheep.
View the first pictures of Philippe Henry's new book project. Distributed by the photographer.

Rocky Mountain National Park
Text in French and English
Trail Ridge Road, the highest continuous park road in the US, takes me to the heart of a special world. Rising to more than 12,000 feet above sea level, the road provides vistas of the magnificent highlands of Rocky Mountain National Park, in northern Colorado. I drove on this road early June 2005, and crossed the continental divide to get to the Kawuneeche valley to film and photograph the wildlife. Between June, when the moose give birth to one or two calves, and late fall, when bull elk advertise their status by bugling, I spent weeks there to document animals' behavior.
Distributed by the photographer.

 

© Philippe Henry 2004 - No reproduction authorized